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Can cannabidiol (CBD) help with Fragile X syndrome?

Those who have Fragile X- or Martin-Bell Syndrome have to deal with several different struggles. As a result, their loved ones are often looking potential additions to their caretaking strategy. Recent research has been suggesting that there may be help from an unexpected source: cannabidiol (CBD).

Talking about CBD

Before we can get into the details of Fragile X and CBD, we need to start by talking about just CBD first.

Cannabis plants, like hemp and marijuana, have 113 different kinds of chemical compounds known as cannabinoids. CBD is one of those compounds. There are also other cannabinoids that you may have heard of. For example, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is a cannabinoid.

You likely have heard of THC because it is psychoactive. That means it creates the high that is so often associated with Cannabis. CBD, while also a cannabinoid, is not psychoactive. It does not create a high. In fact, it is often reported to create a greater sense of calm in its users.

There have been a lot of studies looking at the effects that CBD may be able to have on users. Some of them have looked at things that are connected to Fragile X syndrome.

What is Fragile X syndrome and how might CBD help?

Fragile X syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects development and intellectual abilities. It is a disorder that is more common in males than in females as it is found on the X chromosome (as the name would suggest). It can cause developmental delays in children, speech impediments, difficulty with attention and anxiety, among other things. It is also often linked with Autism.

While CBD may not be able to help with all of the symptoms associated with Fragile X syndrome, there are some studies that suggest that CBD may be able to help with certain symptoms. For example, many people with the disorder struggle with anxiety. New situations can be overstimulating. Many studies on CBD have been focused on the cannabinoid’s calming effects. This study wanted to look at what relief may be able provide people with generalized social anxiety disorder. The researchers found that CBD was able to help the test subjects achieve a greater sense of calm.

Those with Fragile X syndrome also often struggle with attention issues and hyperactivity. Studies on CBD’s calming effects are not just focused on anxiety. Some have looked at CBD’s potential to manage the symptoms of conditions like ADHD. For example, this study looked at how CBD changed the behavior of hyperactive rats. The researchers concluded that CBD was able to help the rats keep their hyperactivity under control without dulling their personalities.

CBD is still being studied and we are still understanding what potential benefits the cannabinoid may be able to provide. As of right now, the studies are promising.

Different kinds of CBD products

There are many different options out there for taking CBD. It is a versatile extract and can be made into just about any product. So, it is easy to find the right product for you or your child.

One of the more common kinds of CBD are oral products. This includes a number of different kinds of products, but it is always best to start with one of the more traditional ones. In this case, traditional is referring to oils and tinctures. These are CBD extracts that have been mixed with a carrier oil, like coconut oil for example. They can be taken in a few different ways. One of the more common ways to take a CBD oil or tincture is to mix it in with food or drink. This is a good way because, while many tinctures and oils have flavoring, some people do not like the flavor of the oils. Mixing it in with food or drink may help mask the flavor. The more direct way to take tinctures or oils is to put a few drops under your tongue. If your child is a picky eater, this may not be the best way for them to take it.

Other kinds of oral products are capsules and tablets. These are different types of pills made with CBD. These are not always the best option for children as kids often have a difficult time swallowing pills. However, soft gel capsules are often flexible, making them a bit easier to swallow for kids or adults who struggle with stiff pills. They also start working faster than regular pills. These are usually products that you dissolve on your tongue. There is no need swallow anything.

The most popular kind of oral product is edibles. These are food and drinks that have CBD mixed in with them. They can vary from candy to pasta. The drinks can be anything from soda to tea. These are so popular because they are easy to take and taste great. These are often the best option for children. However, it is best to keep CBD edibles out of reach of children, to be sure that they do not take too much. There are no serious side effects associated with taking too much CBD. However, it can cause an upset stomach.

The last kind of CBD product out there are topicals. These are things like lotions and cremes with CBD mixed in with them. Topicals are better for more localized effects. The CBD does not move on much past the area the topical is applied. Oral products are more likely to give an overall effect.

People with Fragile X syndrome and their loved ones have to learn to deal with a number of different things. Recent research suggests that CBD may be able to provide some aid in making those things easier to deal with. As more research is done, we hope to understand more how CBD could help. CBD has shown promise with moderating symptoms of other diseases like anxiety. In studies with individuals experiencing discomfort from social speaking, CBD was shown to moderate feelings of discomfort and anxiety from public speaking. CBD has shown promise in moderating the severity and frequency of seizures in those suffering from seizure disorders as well.

If you or a loved one are suffering from Fragile X Syndrome, please contact Panacea Life Sciences, Inc. for a week’s supply of CBD and to participate in our initial efficacy study.

Sources:

https://www.healthline.com/health/fragile-x-syndrome#symptoms

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/fxs/facts.html